M
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 5:13 pm
 Subject: easy newbie EX250 project: install an inline fuel filter

I finally got around to installing an inline fuel filter at the end of July. This is a simple project that can be done with minimal cost and tools.



Left side of the cycle. The petcock is the manual lever that has three controls (reserve, on, off). The petcock controls the flow of fuel from the tank to the carburetors. the black hose runs from the bottom of the petcock to the carburetor intake.



Why install an inline fuel filter? The factory one is not visible without removing it and it is about 1/10 the size of after market filters.

Tools required; a razor blade and some pliers.



Parts required; hose, hose clips, and an inline fuel filter. You can buy all at most automotive parts stores. I chose to buy the hose and hose clips from Kawasaki.



This particular filter is sold at just about every automotive parts store in the state of OK. Cost is $1.99 to 2.99 each.



Look at the fuel direction arrow. The arrow must point towards the carburetors. Otherwise, the engine will die as soon as the bowels empty their stored fuel.



Pull the hose off the petcock and drain the fuel out of it. I use an aluminum can with absorbent in it to solidify the fuel.



Next, cut the hose off as shown in the picture.



Install the fuel filter on the other hose piece as shown. Notice that the filter is oriented so that the fuel flows from the petcock to the carburetor.



Next, install the other end of the inline fuel filter to the hose on the carburetor side.



Cut off the hose enough to allow it to bend and reconnect to the petcock. Pay attention that the hose is long enough and doesn't kink. It is easy to cut off additional hose, but not to lengthen it.



Here is a close-up of the installed inline fuel filter.



Make sure you carry either a spare straight hose (I carry the one I bought from Kawasaki) or a spare inline fuel filter (do both, actually). This is so if the line gets clogged with debris on the road, you can remedy the line rather than be broke down.
rmi03
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 5:30 pm
 Subject: nice pics

If I may add my two cents....

I would recommend tossing those wire hose clamps on the bike and getting some of the kind that are adjusted with a screw driver. I find that there are much easier to tighten/loosen and probably provide a bit more "clamp" (though newbies should make sure not to tighten them too much and brake the plastic filter). They are also more readily available.

After frustrating myself trying to put those wire clamps back on the carb hoses after a carb sync, I decided to put the screwdriver kind on the carbs as well.

Ryan
rmi03
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 5:34 pm
 Subject: Kind of ironic....

that after I just got finished recommending that "newbies" make sure not to overtighten the hose clamps, that it was that post that turned me into a newbie from a lurker.......

I am going to celebrate by dancing around my house in full motorcycle gear (or something as festive).

Ryan
Siriuschris
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 6:31 pm
 Subject: Re: Kind of ironic....

rmi03 wrote:
I am going to celebrate by dancing around my house in full motorcycle gear


weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!
EricE
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 6:43 pm
 Subject: Nice pictures. Seems like a good idea for a weekend project.

dizeldawg
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:00 pm
 Subject: About those filters......

I used the exact same filter on my bike and after 2 years, something in the fuel started to attack the plastic. It got real soft, especially on the inlet side. The inlet nipple actually pulled apart as I was changing the filter out. Luckily, I found it when I was doing the 6000 mile maintenance, and it didn't leave me stuck on the road.

Other than that, they seem to work well.
Anthony
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 9:32 pm
 Subject: Re: nice pics

rmi03 wrote:
If I may add my two cents....

I would recommend tossing those wire hose clamps on the bike and getting some of the kind that are adjusted with a screw driver. I find that there are much easier to tighten/loosen and probably provide a bit more "clamp" (though newbies should make sure not to tighten them too much and brake the plastic filter). They are also more readily available.

After frustrating myself trying to put those wire clamps back on the carb hoses after a carb sync, I decided to put the screwdriver kind on the carbs as well.

Ryan


Vacuum hoses don't even need clamps. I'm not sure why they're there...maybe a vibration issue or something.
kiwi_outdoors
Post Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:21 pm
 Subject: hopefully none of the plastic was dissolved and deposited in the carbs

Payne
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:16 am
 Subject: Another option for side of the road repair

Instead of a spare hose or filter, I carry a nylon splicer. Wise to carry something. I had to use it once, as I had to switch to reserve, and the filter just WOULD NOT prime. Popped in the splicer and donated the filter to the state of NC (i.e. chucked it in the woods)

Payne
M
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:19 am
 Subject: yes, I think it's for vibration myself though the petcock line is very tigh

Bokonon
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:52 am
 Subject: Thanks, Payne. Brian's big on that, too, so it's already in FAQ.

Bokonon
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:53 am
 Subject: Gorgeous pictures, H. I'll add them to FAQ soon :thumbup:

Bokonon
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:55 am
 Subject: I'll add a recommendation to change them once a year. Thanks

dizeldawg
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 7:15 pm
 Subject: Didn't look like it disolved it, just got soft.

Sean
Post Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:29 pm
 Subject: But I only drink out of glass bottles, What should I do? :beer:

But seriously, thanks for the great pics! I think I will go with the Kawi clips so it looks like it was supposed to be there.


So when you turn on the flow, can you see the fuel in the filter?

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